Reflecting on Several Years of Reporting on Hawaii’s Aquarium Fishery

I first went to Hawaii on assignment for CORAL Magazine in 2010, and for the better part of four years I have covered that state’s aquarium fishery. I expected to find a fishery full of complicated regulations and even more complicated conflict. I found the latter in spades, but the former, to my surprise, didn’t really exist. Regulations were relatively few and far between—no total allowable catches (TACs), no quotas, no bag limits, no limited entry. I was, quite frankly, shocked that a commercial fishery in U.S. waters would be so unregulated.

The fishers I interviewed, especially on Big Island, didn’t view it that way. Many felt they were being unfairly… [Read More]

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About Ret Talbot

Ret Talbot is a freelance writer who covers fisheries at the intersection of science and sustainability. His work has appeared in publications such as National Geographic, Mongabay, Discover Magazine, Ocean Geographic and Coral Magazine. He lives on the coast of Maine with his wife, scientific illustrator Karen Talbot.
This entry was posted in Hawaii, Indo-Pacific, Legislation, Ornamental Fisheries and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Reflecting on Several Years of Reporting on Hawaii’s Aquarium Fishery

  1. Pingback: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society Diver Attacked by Aquarium fisherman in Hawaii | Good Catch Blog

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