Test Results Refute Mercury Scare In Frozen Fish Food

All of the ingredients in LRS Reef Frenzy have mean mercury concentrations well below the FDA action level, according to FDA data. Note: The mean mercury concentration shown in the graph for tuna is based on bigeye tuna, which has the highest mean concentration of mercury of all tuna listed in the FDA database. The tuna used in Reef Frenzy most likely has significantly less mercury.

All of the ingredients in LRS Reef Frenzy have mean mercury concentrations well below the FDA action level, according to FDA data. Note: The mean mercury concentration shown in the graph for tuna is based on bigeye tuna, which has the highest mean concentration of mercury of all tuna listed in the FDA database. The tuna used in Reef Frenzy most likely has significantly less mercury.

Two weeks ago, Thomas Brown of Thomas Vision Reef reported unconfirmed test resultsshowing that “one of the top three frozen fish foods” had dangerously high concentrations of mercury in it. According to Brown, “estimated mercury levels exceeded 20 mg per gram of product” in the food in question. Twenty milligrams per gram is equal to 20,000 parts per million (ppm), a dangerously high concentration of mercury 20,000 times the FDA action level of 1.0 ppm.

While the results Brown reported were almost immediately called into question and then subsequently dismissed after a thorough investigation by CORAL Magazine, at least one frozen fish food manufacturer was concerned enough that they elected to send their food out for testing by an accredited laboratory. The results of that first test are now back, and, as expected, the concentration of mercury in that food, as well as two similar foods on the market, is exceedingly low.

Responding to the “Mercury Scare”

“When we learned of this proposed ‘mercury scare,’” says Larry DuPont of LRS Foods, LLC., “we immediately…

[READ FULL STORY AT REEF TO RAINFOREST]

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About Ret Talbot

Ret Talbot is a freelance writer who covers fisheries at the intersection of science and sustainability. His work has appeared in publications such as National Geographic, Mongabay, Discover Magazine, Ocean Geographic and Coral Magazine. He lives on the coast of Maine with his wife, scientific illustrator Karen Talbot.
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