Proposal to List Silky Shark under CITES Adopted

At the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to CITES, the proposal (CoP17 Prop. 42) to include the silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis) in Appendix II was adopted in committee. The Committee’s decision must be confirmed in the CoP17 plenary.

The proponents of the proposal include Bahamas, Bangladesh, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, the Comoros, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, the European Union, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, GuineaBissau, Maldives, Mauritania, Palau, Panama, Samoa, Senegal, Sri Lanka, and Ukraine. Qatar, Japan, Iceland, Indonesia, China, and St. Kitts and Nevis opposed the proposal. The proposal was adopted by secret ballot (requested by Japan) with 111 votes in favor of the proposal.

The CITES Secretariat recommended that the proposal be adopted with the following information:

Based on the available information it is unclear whether Carcharhinus falciformis meets the criteria in Resolution Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP16), Annex 2 a criterion A, for its inclusion in Appendix II when read in conjunction with the footnote with respect to the application of decline for commercially exploited aquatic species in Annex 5. However, the Conference of the Parties, through Resolution Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP16), resolved that Parties by virtue of the precautionary approach and in case of uncertainty regarding the status of a species or the impact of trade on the conservation of a species, shall act in the best interest of the conservation of the species concerned, and the Secretariat recommends taking a precautionary approach.

Stay tuned to the Good Catch Blog for more detailed analysis.

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About Ret Talbot

Ret Talbot is a freelance writer who covers fisheries at the intersection of science and sustainability. His work has appeared in publications such as National Geographic, Mongabay, Discover Magazine, Ocean Geographic and Coral Magazine. He lives on the coast of Maine with his wife, scientific illustrator Karen Talbot.
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